Research Article  |   May 2014
Ergonomic Design of a Computer Mouse for Clients With Wrist Splints
Author Affiliations
  • Chien-Hsiou Liu, PhD, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan
  • Shih-Chen Fan, PhD, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, I-Shou University, 8 Yida Road, Yanchao District, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; maggiefan15@gmail.com
Article Information
Hand and Upper Extremity / Splinting / Work and Industry / Rehabilitation, Disability, and Participation
Research Article   |   May 2014
Ergonomic Design of a Computer Mouse for Clients With Wrist Splints
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2014, Vol. 68, 317-324. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.009928
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2014, Vol. 68, 317-324. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.009928
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We explored effects of cutaneous feedback and hump position on efficiency and comfort in mouse use with a splint. We also analyzed the relationship between anthropometric measurements (width of hand and length of hand, palm, and index) and the task performance.

METHOD. Thirty participants performed a computer task with two forms of mice (front hump and rear hump) and two kinds of wrist splints (dorsal and volar). Movement time and satisfaction scores were recorded.

RESULTS. No interaction effect (Hump Position × Splint Type) was found on movement time. Movement time was shorter for rear-hump mouse users than for front-hump mouse users. Movement time was also shorter for wearers of dorsal wrist splints than for wearers of volar wrist splints. Limited differences existed in the satisfaction scores. Participants with a longer index finger had shorter movement time.

CONCLUSION. Both dorsal wrist splints and rear-hump mice are recommended. Length of index finger positively correlated with task performance.