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Research Article  |   March 2000
Exploration of the Perspectives of Persons With Schizophrenia Regarding Quality of Life
Author Affiliations
  • Deborah Laliberte-Rudman, MSc(OT), BSc(OT), is Lecturer, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, 256 McCaul Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1W5 Canada, and Doctoral Candidate, Graduate Department of Community Health, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto; debbie.rudman@utoronto.ca
  • Betty Yu, Hon BSc, BSc(OT), is Clinical Occupational Therapist, Community Occupational Therapists and Associates, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Elizabeth Scott, MSc, BSc(OT), is Administrative Director, Society, Women and Health Program, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, and Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Parnian Pajouhandeh, BSc, is Researcher, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Clarke Division, and Master’s Student, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Article Information
Mental Health / Schizophrenia
Research Article   |   March 2000
Exploration of the Perspectives of Persons With Schizophrenia Regarding Quality of Life
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March/April 2000, Vol. 54, 137-147. doi:10.5014/ajot.54.2.137
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March/April 2000, Vol. 54, 137-147. doi:10.5014/ajot.54.2.137
Abstract

Objective. This study is the first phase of a two-phase study aimed at exploring the perspectives of consumers with schizophrenia regarding quality of life and developing a quality-of-life assessment that addresses factors experienced as important by consumers.

Method. Focus groups were used to explore the perspectives of 35 persons with schizophrenia regarding the meaning of quality of life and factors important to quality of life.

Results. Seven major factors that had an impact on quality of life resulted from inductive analysis, including activity, social interaction, time, disclosure, “being normal,” finances, and management of illness. These factors relate to three overall themes: managing time, connecting and belonging, and making choices and maintaining control.

Conclusions. Although the findings confirm the importance of factors included in existing quality-of-life assessments, they also highlight the need to look at new dimensions of commonly included factors and to include other factors. The findings support beliefs regarding occupation that are central to occupational therapy and the use of occupation as means and ends of therapy.