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Research Article  |   September 2000
Relationship Between Choice and Quality of Life Among Residents in Long-Term-Care Facilities
Author Affiliations
  • Audrey M. Duncan-Myers, MS, OTR, is Staff Occupational Therapist, St. Charles Hospital, Oregon, Ohio. At the time of this study, she was a graduate student in the Master’s degree program at Eastern Kentucky University. [Mailing address: 3216 Louis Avenue, Troy, Michigan 48083; green@provide.net.]
  • Ruth A. Huebner, PhD, OTR/L, is Professor, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, Kentucky
Article Information
Long-Term Care/Skilled Nursing Facilities / Aging
Research Article   |   September 2000
Relationship Between Choice and Quality of Life Among Residents in Long-Term-Care Facilities
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2000, Vol. 54, 504-508. doi:10.5014/ajot.54.5.504
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2000, Vol. 54, 504-508. doi:10.5014/ajot.54.5.504
Abstract

Objective. This study tested the association between perceptions of personal control and quality of life among older persons.

Method. Two self-report instruments, The Quality of Life Rating (QOLR) and the Duncan Choice Index (DCI), were administered to 21 residents in a long-term-care facility. The DCI was developed for this study to measure the amount of choice available in 29 self-care and leisure activities.

Results. A significant positive correlation (r = .54; p = .01) between the amount of choice residents perceive they have and their quality of life was found. The DCI was shown to be reliable with preliminary evidence of construct validity.

Conclusion. Enhancing personal control in everyday life may be associated with improved quality of life. Occupational therapy strategies to empower residents through increasing choice and control include increasing community in the facility emphasizing personal responsibility, and enabling choices in everyday tasks.