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Research Article  |   January 2001
Variables Affecting the Competency Maintenance Behaviors of Occupational Therapists
Author Affiliations
  • Rosemary M. Lysaght, PhD, is Assistant Professor, Division of Occupational Therapy, University of Utah, 520 Wakara Way, Suite 302, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108-1213
  • James W. Altschuld, PhD, is Professor, The Ohio State University, College of Education, School of Educational Policy and Leadership, Columbus, Ohio
  • H. Kay Grant, PhD, is Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University, School of Allied Health Professions, Division of Occupational Therapy, Columbus, Ohio
  • Janet L. Henderson, EdD, is Associate Professor, Agricultural Education, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
Article Information
Professional Development
Research Article   |   January 2001
Variables Affecting the Competency Maintenance Behaviors of Occupational Therapists
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2001, Vol. 55, 28-35. doi:10.5014/ajot.55.1.28
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2001, Vol. 55, 28-35. doi:10.5014/ajot.55.1.28
Abstract

Objective.The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between work environment and the competency maintenance activities of occupational therapists.

Method.A survey of 121 occupational therapists in three states and interviews with 8 occupational therapists in Ohio were used.

Results.Analysis of survey data indicated that workplace support and the degree of competency monitoring are significant determinants of competency maintenance behavior. State continuing education requirements had no impact on reported levels of competency maintenance. Personal motivation of the therapist emerged as a potentially important moderator of the relationship between environment and competency maintenance.

Conclusions.Although environmental factors enhance competency maintenance activities, active participation in competency maintenance is also related to the personal commitment of the individual therapist. Strategies that reduce barriers to effective competency maintenance and promote a culture of continuing competency in the profession merit further investigation.