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Research Article  |   May 2001
Eliciting Children’s Voices in Qualitative Research
Author Affiliations
  • Clare Curtin, PhD, OTR, is School-Based Occupational Therapist, Jefferson County Public Schools, Golden, Colorado, and Private Practitioner, Children and Youth First Services, 1524 19th Avenue, Longmont, Colorado 80501
Article Information
School-Based Practice / Children
Research Article   |   May 2001
Eliciting Children’s Voices in Qualitative Research
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2001, Vol. 55, 295-302. doi:10.5014/ajot.55.3.295
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2001, Vol. 55, 295-302. doi:10.5014/ajot.55.3.295
Abstract

Objective.The purpose of this literature review was to summarize the issues and techniques involved when incorporating preschool and elementary-school-age children as informants in qualitative research.

Method.Literature on children’s studies, qualitative research with children as informants, and methods for obtaining children’s perspectives were examined.

Results.Conducting qualitative research with children involves different challenges and research techniques than research with adults. The researcher needs to examine beliefs regarding children’s competence, address the inequality of power in the adult–child relationship, and bridge different communication styles. The researcher can employ a variety of techniques and adaptations to help children express themselves.

Conclusion.This review adds to the understanding of occupational therapy researchers about children as informants in research. The practical suggestions presented can also be used in clinical practice to strengthen children’s voices in therapy.