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Research Article  |   July 2001
Using the BTE Primus® to Measure Grip and Wrist Flexion Strength in Physically Active Wheelchair Users: An Exploratory Study
Author Affiliations
  • Orit Shechtman, PhD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610; oshechtm@hp.ufl.edu
  • Leanne MacKinnon, MHS, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, Nova Scotia Rehabilitation Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • Catherine Locklear, MHS, OTR/L, is Research Interviewer, Rehabilitation Engineering and Research Center on Aging, Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Article Information
Hand and Upper Extremity / Physical Abilities
Research Article   |   July 2001
Using the BTE Primus® to Measure Grip and Wrist Flexion Strength in Physically Active Wheelchair Users: An Exploratory Study
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2001, Vol. 55, 393-400. doi:10.5014/ajot.55.4.393
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2001, Vol. 55, 393-400. doi:10.5014/ajot.55.4.393
Abstract

Objective.The purpose of this study was to establish test–retest reliability values for the newly designed grip and wrist attachments of the BTE Primus® and to determine criterion-related validity of the new grip attachment against the Jamar dynamometer. An additional purpose was to explore the differences in grip and wrist flexion strength between wheelchair users and control participants without disabilities and to examine the effect of body position on strength in persons without disabilities.

Method.Wheelchair users and matched controls (13 per group) were tested for grip and wrist flexion strength on the BTE Primus and for grip on the Jamar dynamometer.

Results.The BTE Primus grip attachment was found to be valid and reliable. No significant differences were found in static and dynamic grip or wrist flexion strength between the two groups or in the sitting versus standing position for the control group.

Conclusion.The findings suggest that the BTE Primus may be used to assess grip and wrist flexion strength validly and reliably for both wheelchair users and persons without disabilities.