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Research Article  |   September 2001
Describing and Predicting the Possession of Assistive Devices Among Persons With Multiple Sclerosis
Author Affiliations
  • Marcia Finlayson, PhD, OT(C), OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1919 West Taylor Street (MC 811), Chicago, Illinois 60612; marciaf@uic.edu
  • Leslie Guglielmello, MOT, is Occupational Therapist, RehabPlus Staffing Group, Largo, Maryland
  • Kathryn Liefer, MOT, is Occupational Therapist, Pinecrest Rehabilitation Hospital, Delray Beach, Florida
Article Information
Assistive Technology / Multiple Sclerosis / Neurologic Conditions / Physical Disability/Ability
Research Article   |   September 2001
Describing and Predicting the Possession of Assistive Devices Among Persons With Multiple Sclerosis
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2001, Vol. 55, 545-551. doi:10.5014/ajot.55.5.545
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2001, Vol. 55, 545-551. doi:10.5014/ajot.55.5.545
Abstract

Objective.This study describes the types of assistive devices in the possession of persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) and identifies factors that best predicted the probability of possessing these devices.

Method.A secondary analysis using frequency distributions and logistic regression of existing cross-sectional data was completed. Data were from an anonymous mail survey of members of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada (Atlantic Division) (N = 906).

Results.Mobility aids and grab bars were the most commonly reported assistive devices. Seeing an occupational therapist, not working, having a progressive type of MS, having more activity limitations and more symptoms, and having MS for a longer period were found to increase the probability of possessing assistive devices.

Conclusion.The descriptive results of this study are similar to studies of assistive technology use by older adults and persons with other chronic conditions. Type of MS and seeing an occupational therapist were the two strongest predictors of possessing assistive devices among respondents.