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Research Article  |   September 2001
Use of the UFOV to Evaluate and Retrain Visual Attention Skills in Clients With Stroke: A Pilot Study
Author Affiliations
  • Barbara L. Mazer, BSc(OT), MSc(Rehab), PhD (Epi & Biostat) Researcher, Jewish Rehabilitation Hospital, 3205 Place Alton Goldbloom, Laval, Quebec H7V 1R2, Canada, and Faculty Lecturer, McGill University, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; barbara.mazer@mcgill.ca
  • Susan Sofer, BSc(OT), CDRS, is Occupational Therapist, Jewish Rehabilitation Hospital, Laval, Quebec, Canada; Director, AUTONOMY•COMMUNITY•THERAPY A.C.T. Inc.; and Part-Time Faculty Lecturer, McGill University, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Nicol Korner-Bitensky, BSc(OT), MSc(Rehab), PhD(Rehab), is Associate Professor, McGill University, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Isabelle Gelinas, BSc(OT), MSc(OT), PhD(Rehab), is Researcher, Jewish Rehabilitation Hospital, Laval, Quebec, Canada, and Assistant Professor, McGill University, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Stroke / Physical Disability/Ability
Research Article   |   September 2001
Use of the UFOV to Evaluate and Retrain Visual Attention Skills in Clients With Stroke: A Pilot Study
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2001, Vol. 55, 552-557. doi:10.5014/ajot.55.5.552
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2001, Vol. 55, 552-557. doi:10.5014/ajot.55.5.552
Abstract

Objective.The objective of this pilot study was to examine the use of a visual attention analyzer in the evaluation and retraining of useful field of view in clients with stroke.

Method.Fifty-two clients with stroke referred to a driving evaluation service were evaluated with a visual attention analyzer referred to as the UFOV. The UFOV assesses three aspects of visual attention: processing speed, divided attention, and selective attention. Seven participants were retested to determine the test–retest reliability of the UFOV. Six participated in the development of a training protocol and in a 20-session visual attention retraining program.

Results.UFOV scores indicated substantial reduction in visual attention in clients after stroke, with older participants performing the most poorly. Test–retest reliability was moderate (ICC = .70). Mean UFOV scores improved significantly after retraining.

Conclusion.Although UFOV scores indicated poor visual attention skills in clients with stroke, preliminary information suggests that UFOV scores significantly improve with training.