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Brief Report  |   September 2001
Physical Properties of Short-Stretch Compression Bandages Used To Treat Lymphedema
Author Affiliations
  • Theodore I. King, II, PhD, OT, is Associate Professor, Occupational Therapy Department, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201
  • Jessica L. Droessler, MS, is Occupational Therapist, Coulee Children’s Center, LaCrosse, Wisconsin
Article Information
Departments / Brief Report
Brief Report   |   September 2001
Physical Properties of Short-Stretch Compression Bandages Used To Treat Lymphedema
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2001, Vol. 55, 573-576. doi:10.5014/ajot.55.5.573
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2001, Vol. 55, 573-576. doi:10.5014/ajot.55.5.573
Abstract

This study examined the physical properties of six common brands of short-stretch compression bandages used to treat lymphedema. The physical properties examined were (a) maintenance of pressure over a 12-hr period, (b) variability of pressure across the width of the bandages, and (c) variability of pressure when the bandages were wrapped with a 50% overlap. The results of the study indicate that all six brands of bandages tested maintain pressure well over a 12-hr period. Each has a variance of pressure between the middle and edge of the bandage, with the edges measuring (in mmHg) between 6% and 28% lower than the middle. When the bandages were wrapped with an 50% overlap, all six brands measured fairly consistently in pressure readings (in mmHg) across the width. These results indicate that the six brands of short-stretch compression bandages tested have similar physical characteristics.