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Research Article  |   January 2003
Qualitative Data Analysis: Challenges and Dilemmas Related to Theory and Method
Author Affiliations
  • Diana M. Bailey, EdD, OTR, FAOTA, is Associate Professor, Tufts University, Boston School of Occupational Therapy, Medford, MA 02155; diana.bailey@tufts.edu
  • Jeanne M. Jackson, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, is Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, 1540 Alcazar Street, CHP-133, Los Angeles, CA 90089-9003; jmjackso@usc.edu
Article Information
Special Section: Qualitative Research
Research Article   |   January 2003
Qualitative Data Analysis: Challenges and Dilemmas Related to Theory and Method
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2003, Vol. 57, 57-65. doi:10.5014/ajot.57.1.57
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2003, Vol. 57, 57-65. doi:10.5014/ajot.57.1.57
Abstract

The purpose of this article is to initiate a discussion of the struggles and challenges we encountered as we developed a method of analysis for a particular qualitative study. We present our thinking process showing the questions that arose, the theoretical ideas on which we relied, and the decisions we made at crucial junctures. Portions from several theoretical frames used as the basis for the analysis are presented and include Polkinghorne’s (1995) narrative inquiry, Glaser and Strauss’s (1967) and Charmaz’s (2000) grounded theory, Riessman’s (1990b) mixed approach to analysis, and Rosaldo’s (1989) ideas on reflexivity. Examples from the study are used to illustrate points in the analysis.