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Brief Report  |   September 2003
A Comparison of Consultative Model and Direct–Indirect Intervention With Preschoolers
Author Affiliations
  • Diann S. Dreiling, MS, OTR, is School Therapist, Douglas County School District, Castle Rock, Colorado. At the time of the study, she was Graduate Student, Occupational Therapy Program, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado. Mailing address: 1478 S. Moline, Aurora, Colorado 80012; ddotr@AOL.com
  • Anita C. Bundy, ScD, OTR, is Professor and Chair, School of Occupation and Leisure Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. At the time the study was completed, she was Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado
Article Information
Complementary/Alternative Approaches / Departments / Brief Report
Brief Report   |   September 2003
A Comparison of Consultative Model and Direct–Indirect Intervention With Preschoolers
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2003, Vol. 57, 566-569. doi:10.5014/ajot.57.5.566
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2003, Vol. 57, 566-569. doi:10.5014/ajot.57.5.566
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of a consultative model of intervention with that of direct–indirect intervention for meeting goals of preschool students with mild motor delays.

METHOD. Two occupational therapists provided consultation to teams working with 11 children 1 day a week for all 40 weeks of the school year. A different occupational therapist provided direct–indirect treatment to another 9 children for a full week every 3 weeks for the 40 weeks of the school year. Data for both groups used in this study were kept for the last 4 months at the end of the school year or as the children appeared to be nearing completion of their goals of the study. All therapists met with their teams twice a month to plan and review progress. All parents carried out activities with their children at home. Goal Attainment Scaling was used to examine progress.

RESULTS. No statistically significant differences were found between the two types of intervention (t = .359; df = 18; p = .724).

CONCLUSION. The study suggests that a consultative model and a direct–indirect model are equally effective in meeting objectives for preschoolers with relatively mild motor impairments.