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Research Article  |   March 2004
Client-Oriented Role Evaluation (CORE): The Development of a Clinical Rehabilitation Instrument to Assess Role Change Associated With Disability
Author Affiliations
  • Darene Toal-Sullivan, MA(Ed), OTReg(Ont), OT(C), is Director of Professional Practice, Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists, CTTC Building, Suite 3400, 1125 Colonel by Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5R1, Canada; dtoalsullivan@caot.ca
  • Peter R. Henderson, PhD, CPsych, is Co-Service Leader of Chronic Pain Rehabilitative Service, The Rehabilitation Centre, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and is Clinical Professor, School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Article Information
Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Rehabilitation
Research Article   |   March 2004
Client-Oriented Role Evaluation (CORE): The Development of a Clinical Rehabilitation Instrument to Assess Role Change Associated With Disability
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March/April 2004, Vol. 58, 211-220. doi:10.5014/ajot.58.2.211
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March/April 2004, Vol. 58, 211-220. doi:10.5014/ajot.58.2.211
Abstract

This paper describes the development of an instrument, the Client-Oriented Role Evaluation (CORE), to help meet the needs of rehabilitation clients and clinicians in their joint efforts to define realistic and meaningful therapeutic goals. The CORE is based on a model that captures the relationship among identity, roles, constituent occupations, and personal and environmental determinants. The model encourages a comprehensive approach to examining role change and role loss that occurs with disability. The instrument consists of a series of steps in which role changes are identified, role values are assigned, and satisfaction with role performance is rated at different points in time across the rehabilitation process. A description of the CORE development is presented along with preliminary data from clients involved in a chronic pain rehabilitation program.