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Research Article  |   September 2009
Effects of an Explicit Problem-Solving Skills Training Program Using a Metacomponential Approach for Outpatients With Acquired Brain Injury
Author Affiliations
  • Kenneth N. K. Fong, PhD, OTR, is Assistant Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong; rsnkfong@polyu.edu.hk
  • Dorothy R. Howie, PhD, is Senior Lecturer, Centre of Educational Studies, Institute for Learning, University of Hull, Hull, United Kingdom; d.r.howie@hull.ac.uk
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Treatment Effects
Research Article   |   September 2009
Effects of an Explicit Problem-Solving Skills Training Program Using a Metacomponential Approach for Outpatients With Acquired Brain Injury
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2009, Vol. 63, 525-534. doi:10.5014/ajot.63.5.525
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2009, Vol. 63, 525-534. doi:10.5014/ajot.63.5.525
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We investigated the effects of an explicit problem-solving skills training program using a meta componential approach with 33 outpatients with moderate acquired brain injury, in the Hong Kong context.

METHOD. We compared an experimental training intervention with this explicit problem-solving approach, which taught metacomponential strategies, with a conventional cognitive training approach that did not have this explicit metacognitive training.

RESULTS. We found significant advantages for the experimental group on the Metacomponential Interview measure in association with the explicit metacomponential training, but transfer to the real-life problem-solving measures was not evidenced in statistically significant findings. Small sample size, limited time of intervention, and some limitations with these tools may have been contributing factors to these results.

CONCLUSION. The training program was demonstrated to have a significantly greater effect than the conventional training approach on metacomponential functioning and the component of problem representation. However, these benefits were not transferable to real-life situations.