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Research Article  |   September 2009
Use of the Dynamic Interactional Model in Self-Care and Motor Intervention After Traumatic Brain Injury: Explanatory Case Studies
Author Affiliations
  • Sharon Zlotnik, MSc, is Occupational Therapist, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa, Israel
  • Dalia Sachs, PhD, is Senior Lecturer, Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences, University of Haifa, Israel
  • Sara Rosenblum, PhD, is Senior Lecturer and Department Chair, Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences, University of Haifa, Israel
  • Raluka Shpasser, MD, is Director, Children's Rehabilitation Unit, Loewenstein Hospital Rehabilitation Center, Raanana, Israel
  • Naomi Josman, PhD, is Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences, University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, Haifa 31905 Israel; naomij@research.haifa.ac.il
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Treatment Effects
Research Article   |   September 2009
Use of the Dynamic Interactional Model in Self-Care and Motor Intervention After Traumatic Brain Injury: Explanatory Case Studies
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2009, Vol. 63, 549-558. doi:10.5014/ajot.63.5.549
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2009, Vol. 63, 549-558. doi:10.5014/ajot.63.5.549
Abstract

PURPOSE. The highest proportion of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) occurs among adolescents. This study examines the effectiveness of a therapeutic protocol for rehabilitation of adolescents with TBI. This protocol is based on Toglia's (1998, 2005) Dynamic Interactional Model and Expanded Awareness Model (Toglia & Kirk, 2000).

METHOD. Explanatory case studies presenting 2 adolescents (ages 16–17) with mild to moderate TBI are combined with qualitative and quantitative data assessing self-care, mobility, and graphomotor abilities as well as deficit awareness in these domains. Outcome measures include the FIM™, the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, the Computerized Penmanship Object Evaluation Tool, and the Awareness of Mobility Deficits Questionnaire. Graphic data analysis compared outcome measures before, during, and after intervention.

RESULTS. The Dynamic Interactional Model was effective in improving self-care, mobility, and graphomotor abilities and identified awareness of deficits in these domains.

CONCLUSION. These research findings contribute to our theoretical knowledge in rehabilitation and promote adopting this approach for rehabilitation of adolescents with TBI.