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Research Article  |   September 2009
Traumatic Brain Injury and Driving Assessment: An Evidence-Based Literature Review
Author Affiliations
  • Sherrilene Classen, PhD, MPH, OTR/L, is Director, Institute for Mobility, Activity and Participation; and Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, PO Box 100164, Gainesville, FL 32611-0164; sclassen@phhp.ufl.edu
  • Charles Levy, MD, is Adjunct Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville; Chief of the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service, leader of clinical care for personnel with TBI/PTSD, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Gainesville, FL
  • Dennis McCarthy, PhD, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Florida International University, Miami
  • William C. Mann, PhD, is Distinguished Professor and Chair, Department of Occupational Therapy; Chair, Advisory Committee, Institute for Mobility, Activity, and Participation; and Director of Rehabilitation Science Doctoral Program, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Desiree Lanford, MOT, CDRS, is Certified Driving Rehabilitation Specialist, Department of Occupational Therapy, and Institute for Mobility, Activity, and Participation, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • J. Kay Waid-Ebbs, MS, BCBA, is Doctoral Candidate, Rehabilitation Science Doctoral Program, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, and Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Gainesville, FL
Article Information
Community Mobility and Driving / Neurologic Conditions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Instrument Development and Testing
Research Article   |   September 2009
Traumatic Brain Injury and Driving Assessment: An Evidence-Based Literature Review
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2009, Vol. 63, 580-591. doi:10.5014/ajot.63.5.580
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2009, Vol. 63, 580-591. doi:10.5014/ajot.63.5.580
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We conducted a literature review of assessment tools predicting driving performance for people with traumatic brain injury (TBI).

METHOD. Data sources were Web of Science, EBSCOhost, PubMed, and recently published literature from experts and team members not yet catalogued in the databases. We used the American Academy of Neurology's classification criteria to extract data from 13 studies, and we assigned a class (I–IV, with I being the highest level of evidence) to each study. We grouped primary studies into categories of driving assessment (neuropsychological; simulator; off-road; self-report, other report, and postinjury disability status; and comprehensive driving evaluation) and synthesized the predictability of these tools as it relates to driving performance for people with TBI.

CONCLUSIONS. To assist clinicians and researchers in making decisions regarding testing the driving performance of people with TBI, we provide recommendations for neuropsychological tests; off-road tests; self-report, other report, and postinjury disability status; and comprehensive driving evaluation.