Free
Research Article  |   January 2009
Differences in Patterns of Participation Between Youths With Cerebral Palsy and Typically Developing Peers
Author Affiliations
  • Batya Engel-Yeger, PhD, is Lecturer, Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences, University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, Haifa, Israel 31950; batya@research.haifa.ac.il
  • Tal Jarus, PhD, OTR, is Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, CanDo Research Center, University of British Columbia. Tal Jarus was at the Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel, at the time of the study
  • Dana Anaby, PhD, is Occupational Therapist and Doctoral Candidate, Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Rehabilitation Science Graduate Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia
  • Mary Law, PhD, is Professor and Associate Dean, School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Children and Youth
Research Article   |   January 2009
Differences in Patterns of Participation Between Youths With Cerebral Palsy and Typically Developing Peers
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2009, Vol. 63, 96-104. doi:10.5014/ajot.63.1.96
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2009, Vol. 63, 96-104. doi:10.5014/ajot.63.1.96
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. This study investigated the effects of cerebral palsy (CP) and gender on youth participation in activities outside of formal school.

METHOD. Twenty-two participants with CP and 30 typically developing peers, ages 12–16 years, completed the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment (CAPE; King et al., 2004).

RESULTS. Typically developing youths engaged in a broader range of activities and did so more frequently than did youths with CP. Similar levels of enjoyment in activity were found in both groups. In some scales of the CAPE, youths with CP participated in proportionally more activities alone and at home. Gender differences and Group ×Gender interaction were found in some scales with respect to participation in and enjoyment of activities.

CONCLUSIONS. Physical limitations associated with CP may affect the frequency of a child's participation in activity outside of school. However, youths with CP may express levels of enjoyment similar to those of typically developing peers while participating in activity.