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Research Article  |   March 2008
Predicting Fitness to Drive Using the Visual Recognition Slide Test (USyd)
Author Affiliations
  • Lynnette G. Kay, BOccThy, is a doctoral student, Discipline of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe, New South Wales 1825, Australia; L.Kay@usyd.edu.au
  • Anita C. Bundy, ScD, is Professor, Discipline of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Australia
  • Lindy M. Clemson, PhD, is Associate Professor, Discipline of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Australia
Article Information
Assessment Development and Testing / Community Mobility and Driving / Driving and Community Mobility
Research Article   |   March 2008
Predicting Fitness to Drive Using the Visual Recognition Slide Test (USyd)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March/April 2008, Vol. 62, 187-197. doi:10.5014/ajot.62.2.187
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March/April 2008, Vol. 62, 187-197. doi:10.5014/ajot.62.2.187
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The authors examined the construct and predictive validity and internal reliability of the Visual Recognition Slide Test developed at the University of Sydney (VRST–USyd).

METHOD. A historical cohort study using retrospective descriptive analysis of VRST–USyd scores and on-road driving performance for 838 drivers with impairments was conducted.

RESULTS. Rasch analysis provided evidence for the construct validity and internal reliability of the VRST–USyd. Goodness-of-fit statistics for all items were acceptable. The test had high participant and item reliability indexes and separated the participants into four groups with varying levels of skill. Using a cutoff score of 95/164, the sensitivity of the test was 81%, and the specificity was 90%. However, when coupled with clinicians’ judgment of participants’ awareness of their driving performance during the on-road assessment, this score improved.

CONCLUSION. There is evidence for reliability and construct and predictive validity of the VRST–USyd. The measurement of awareness requires further research.