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Research Article  |   September 2006
Beyond Active Learning: A Case Study of Teaching Practices in an Occupation-Centered Curriculum
Author Affiliations
  • Barbara Hooper, PhD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Occupational Therapy Graduate Program, Health Sciences and Services Building, University of New Mexico, MSC09 5240, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131; bhooper@salud.unm.edu
Article Information
Education of OTs and OTAs / Education in Occupational Therapy
Research Article   |   September 2006
Beyond Active Learning: A Case Study of Teaching Practices in an Occupation-Centered Curriculum
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2006, Vol. 60, 551-562. doi:10.5014/ajot.60.5.551
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2006, Vol. 60, 551-562. doi:10.5014/ajot.60.5.551
Abstract

Although occupation-centered curricula are highly promoted, the teaching processes that convey such designs remain unclear. This case study elucidated occupation-centered teaching practices. Interview and observational data were collected over 8 weeks, and analysis involved coding transcriptions, data matrices, concept maps, journaling, and writing. Participants augmented active learning strategies with strategies that linked course topics to the subject of occupation. The use of linking strategies suggested that: (a) course content was treated as two-tiered; (b) neither content nor instructional processes were inherently occupation-centered; and (c) subject-centered education strengthens social learning theories. Although curricula may appear occupation-centered based on a curriculum description and course content, ultimately “linking opportunities” in the classroom constitute an essential feature that demarcates a program as occupation-centered.