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Research Article  |   July 2006
Occupational Therapy Activities and Intervention Techniques for Clients With Stroke in Six Rehabilitation Hospitals
Author Affiliations
  • Nancy K. Latham, PhD, is Research Assistant Professor, Health and Disability Research Institute, Boston University, 53 Bay State Road, Boston, Massachusetts 02215; nlatham@bu.edu
  • Diane U. Jette, DSc, PT, is Professor and Program Director, Physical Therapy Program, Simmons College, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Wendy Coster, PhD, OTR, is Associate Professor and Program Director, Therapeutic Studies and Occupational Therapy, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Lorie Richards, PhD, OTR, is Research Health Scientist, Veterans Affairs Research Service at the Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, North Florida/South Georgia Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida; and Associate Professor, Occupational Therapy Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
  • Randall J. Smout, MS, is Senior Analyst, International Severity Information Systems, Inc., Salt Lake City, Utah
  • Roberta A. James is Data Systems Specialist, International Severity Information Systems, Inc., Salt Lake City, Utah
  • Julie Gassaway, MS, RN, is Director of Project/Product Development, International Severity Information Systems, Inc., Salt Lake City, Utah
  • Susan D. Horn, PhD, is Vice President for Research, International Severity Information Systems, Inc., Salt Lake City, Utah
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Stroke / Adult Physical Rehabilitation
Research Article   |   July 2006
Occupational Therapy Activities and Intervention Techniques for Clients With Stroke in Six Rehabilitation Hospitals
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2006, Vol. 60, 369-378. doi:10.5014/ajot.60.4.369
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2006, Vol. 60, 369-378. doi:10.5014/ajot.60.4.369
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. To prospectively monitor occupational therapy activities and intervention techniques used during inpatient stroke rehabilitation in order to provide a description of current clinical practice.

METHODS. Data were collected prospectively from 954 clients with stroke receiving occupational therapy from six U.S. rehabilitation hospitals. Descriptive statistics summarized frequency, intensity, and duration of occupational therapy sessions; proportion of time spent in 16 therapeutic activities; and proportion of those activities that included any of 31 interventions.

RESULTS. Clients received on average 11.8 days (SD = 7.2) of occupational therapy, with each session lasting on average 39.4 min (SD = 16.9). Upper-extremity control (22.9% of treatment time) and dressing (14.2% of treatment time) were the most frequently provided activities. Interventions provided most frequently during upper-extremity control activities were strengthening, motor learning, and postural awareness.

CONCLUSION. Occupational therapy provided reflected an integration of treatment approaches. Upper-extremity control and basic activities of daily living were the most frequent activities. A small proportion of sessions addressed community integration.