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Research Article  |   July 2006
Sensory Processing Patterns in Persons With Angelman Syndrome
Author Affiliations
  • Nicolay Chertkoff Walz, PhD, is Assistant Professor, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, MLC 3015, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229-3039
  • Grace T. Baranek, PhD, OTR/L, is Associate Professor, Division of Occupational Science CB#7120, Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7120
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Sensory Integration and Processing / Evaluation and Intervention for Children and Adolescents
Research Article   |   July 2006
Sensory Processing Patterns in Persons With Angelman Syndrome
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2006, Vol. 60, 472-479. doi:10.5014/ajot.60.4.472
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2006, Vol. 60, 472-479. doi:10.5014/ajot.60.4.472
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. Research examining sensory processing patterns in persons with Angelman syndrome is nonexistent despite anecdotal evidence and clinical diagnostic criteria that may reflect these features. The goal of this study was to better characterize sensory processing patterns in persons with Angelman syndrome.

METHOD. Parents of 340 persons with Angelman syndrome between 3 and 22 years of age completed a standardized measure of sensory processing, the Sensory Experiences Questionnaire.

RESULTS. Results confirmed a high degree and variety of sensory processing abnormalities in persons with Angelman syndrome. These problems were most prominent in the areas of hypo-responsiveness to tactile and vestibular input, consistent with reports of sensory seeking behaviors in this population. Sensory processing deficits were not related to gender, seizure disorder, or genetic subtype. However, some behaviors were correlated with age.

CONCLUSION. This study provides the first systematic description of sensory processing abnormalities in a large sample of persons with Angelman syndrome. Considerations for enhancing occupational performance and social participation in this population through occupational therapy interventions are discussed.