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Research Article  |   July 1995
A Study of the Development of Traits of Entry-Level Occupational Therapy Students
Author Affiliations
  • Mary V. Donohue, PhD, OTR, is Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, New York University, 35 West 4th Street, 11th Floor, New York, New York 10012
Article Information
Education of OTs and OTAs / Education
Research Article   |   July 1995
A Study of the Development of Traits of Entry-Level Occupational Therapy Students
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 1995, Vol. 49, 703-709. doi:10.5014/ajot.49.7.703
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 1995, Vol. 49, 703-709. doi:10.5014/ajot.49.7.703
Abstract

Objectives. This study compared the personality traits of entry-level occupational therapy students before and after their participation in 2 years of academic and clinical education in order to examine the change of traits in their professional personality profile.

Method. Forty-nine occupational therapy students completed the 18 scales of the California Psychological Inventory during their first fall and second spring semesters. This time span included two Level I and one Level II fieldwork experiences.

Results. T tests were used to analyze the students’ scales. Students’ scores in the second test showed a statistically significant increase in 13 of the 18 scales as compared to their first test scores. Achievement via independence and psychological-mindedness emerged as the highest ranking personality traits of the students in their second test scores.

Conclusion. The occupational therapy curriculum may have influenced the scores of the entry-level students, in both intellectual and psychosocial traits, in a positive direction.