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Research Article  |   February 1994
Comparison of Individual and Group/Consultation Treatment Methods for Preschool Children With Developmental Delays
Author Affiliations
  • Patricia L. Davies, MS, OTR, is Staff Occupational Therapist, Developmental Preschool and Day Care Center, Laramie, Wyoming, and a graduate student, Experimental Psychology and Neuroscience PhD Program, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming (Mailing address: 1520 Sheridan, Laramie, Wyoming 82070). At the time of this study, she was Director of Neuromuscular Therapies at the Institute of Logopedics, Wichita, Kansas
  • William J. Gavin, PhD, is Associate Professor, Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming. At the time of this study he was Director of Research, Institute of Logopedics, Wichita, Kansas
Article Information
Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Research
Research Article   |   February 1994
Comparison of Individual and Group/Consultation Treatment Methods for Preschool Children With Developmental Delays
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 1994, Vol. 48, 155-161. doi:10.5014/ajot.48.2.155
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 1994, Vol. 48, 155-161. doi:10.5014/ajot.48.2.155
Abstract

Objectives. Although alternative treatment methods are becoming more widely discussed and implemented in pediatric occupational therapy, empirical data demonstrating the effectiveness of these treatment methods are lacking. The present study compares the effectiveness of an alternative treatment method (group/consultation) to traditional direct therapy.

Method. Eighteen preschool subjects classified as developmentally delayed received either individual/direct therapy or group/consultation therapy. Each child was assessed initially and again 7 months later with three standardized tests assessing fine motor and gross motor development, functional skills in the home, and nonverbal intelligence.

Results. Subjects in both treatment methods demonstrated significant increases in both fine and gross motor skills with the rate approximating that of the normal distribution of typically developing children.

Conclusion. There were no statistically significant differences between treatment methods on any of the assessments.