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Research Article  |   May 1994
Prediction of Preschool Sensory and Motor Performance by 18-Month Neurologic Scores Among Children Born Prematurely
Author Affiliations
  • Shelly J. Lane, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is an Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, State University of New York at Buffalo, 515 Kimball Tower, Buffalo, New York 14214
  • Carla Soares Attanasio, MS, OT(c), is a Staff Therapist, Glenrose Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. At the time of this project, she was a graduate student, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
  • Rebecca Farmer Huselid, PhD, is an Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Hunter College, New York, New York. At the time of this project, she was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for the Research of Behavioral and Social Aspects of Health, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York
Article Information
School-Based Practice / Research
Research Article   |   May 1994
Prediction of Preschool Sensory and Motor Performance by 18-Month Neurologic Scores Among Children Born Prematurely
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May 1994, Vol. 48, 391-396. doi:10.5014/ajot.48.5.391
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May 1994, Vol. 48, 391-396. doi:10.5014/ajot.48.5.391
Abstract

Objectives. Premature birth places a child at risk for a number of academic and behavioral deficits. The challenge currently facing interventionists is to identify at an early age those preterm children who will develop such deficits. Identified children can then be targeted for intervention to forestall deficits at school age.

Method. This study examined the use of a neurologic assessment, administered at 18 months of age, to identify children who will have difficulties at preschool age. Premature children identified as neurologically normal or neurologicaliy suspicious at the age of 18 months were tested with the Miller Assessment for Preschoolers.

Results. Although there was some variability in performance, as a group the children classified as neurologically suspicious at 18 months continued to fall into a risk category at 4 years of age.

Conclusion. Because such categorization may predict inadequate performance during the school-age years, monitoring of the child’s development is warranted.