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Research Article  |   September 2004
The Everyday Occupation of Families With Children With Autism
Author Affiliations
  • Beth Werner DeGrace, PhD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Science, College of Allied Health, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, PO Box 26901, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73190; beth-degrace@ouhsc.edu
Article Information
Autism/Autism Spectrum Disorder / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Families and Occupations
Research Article   |   September 2004
The Everyday Occupation of Families With Children With Autism
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2004, Vol. 58, 543-550. doi:10.5014/ajot.58.5.543
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2004, Vol. 58, 543-550. doi:10.5014/ajot.58.5.543
Abstract

The purpose of this qualitative research study was to understand a family’s experiences negotiating family daily life and the meanings they ascribed to these experiences when they had a child with severe autism. In-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted with five family units. The interviews explored the meaning of the family’s participation in daily life activities. The transcribed interviews were analyzed with a phenomenological method. The results emerging from this study indicate that families with children with severe autism may experience difficulty engaging in daily activities that hold positive meaning and rely on stringent patterns of routines that revolve around the child with autism to meet the demands of daily life.