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Research Article  |   January 2005
Reliability and Validity of a Videotape Method To Describe Expressive Behavior in Persons With Parkinson’s Disease
Author Affiliations
  • Kathleen Doyle Lyons, ScD, OTR/L, is Project Coordinator, Center for Psycho-oncology Research, Dartmouth Medical School, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire. Correspondence address: 7750 Psychiatry Department, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, 1 Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03750; Kathleen.D.Lyons@dartmouth.edu
  • Linda Tickle-Degnen, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, is Associate Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Parkinson's Disease / Technology
Research Article   |   January 2005
Reliability and Validity of a Videotape Method To Describe Expressive Behavior in Persons With Parkinson’s Disease
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2005, Vol. 59, 41-49. doi:10.5014/ajot.59.1.41
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2005, Vol. 59, 41-49. doi:10.5014/ajot.59.1.41
Abstract

The ability to effectively communicate thoughts, feelings, and identity to others is an important aspect of occupational performance. The symptoms of Parkinson’s disease can impair a person’s ability to verbally and non-verbally communicate with others. In order to better understand issues of communication functioning for this population, research tools to describe expressive and communicative behavior during occupation and social interaction are needed. In this study, six persons with Parkinson’s disease participated in individual, videotaped interviews focused on problem solving during daily activities. Three trained graduate students viewed edited clips from the videotapes and completed a rating scale of expressive behavior designed by the authors. Data support the reliability and construct validity of the behavioral rating scale, suggesting that measures of expressive behavior of persons with Parkinson’s disease can be effectively derived using short segments of videotaped activity.