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Research Article  |   July 2005
Vision, Visual-Information Processing, and Academic Performance Among Seventh-Grade Schoolchildren: A More Significant Relationship Than We Thought?
Author Affiliations
  • Sarina Goldstand, MSc, OTR, is Pediatric Clinician and Staff Member, School of Occupational Therapy, Hebrew University, Israel
  • Kenneth C. Koslowe, OD, MS, is Senior Lecturer, Department of Optometry, Hadassah College, Jerusalem, Israel
  • Shula Parush, PhD, OTR, is Director of Graduate Studies, School of Occupational Therapy, Hebrew University, P.O. Box 24026, Mount Scopus, Jerusalem 91240, Israel; shula.parush@huji.ac.il
Article Information
Vision / Visual Perception and Visual Factors
Research Article   |   July 2005
Vision, Visual-Information Processing, and Academic Performance Among Seventh-Grade Schoolchildren: A More Significant Relationship Than We Thought?
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2005, Vol. 59, 377-389. doi:10.5014/ajot.59.4.377
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2005, Vol. 59, 377-389. doi:10.5014/ajot.59.4.377
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. To compare visual and visual-information processing skills between children with and without mild reading and academic problems and examine the incidence of visual deficits among them.

METHOD. Seventy-one seventh graders classified as proficient (n = 46) and nonproficient (n = 25) readers were compared with respect to scores on an accepted vision screening, on tests of visual-perception, visual-motor integration, and academic performance. Further, academic performance and visual-information processing were compared between children who failed and passed the vision screening.

RESULTS. Visual deficits were found in 68% of the participants, and among significantly more boys than girls. Nonproficient readers had significantly poorer academic performance and vision-screening scores than the proficient readers. Participants who passed the visual screening performed significantly better in visual perception than those who failed.

CONCLUSION. Visual function significantly distinguishes between children with and without mild academic problems, as well as on visual-perception scores. The high occurrence of visual deficits among participants warrants consideration of vision deficits among schoolchildren with academic performance difficulties.