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Research Article  |   August 1994
Comparing Motor and Process Ability of Persons With Suspected Dementia in Home and Clinic Settings
Author Affiliations
  • Louise Nygård, OT, is a doctoral student, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Family Medicine, Section of Geriatric Medicine and Center of Caring Sciences (CVV South), Huddinge University Hospital, 141 86, Huddinge, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Birgitta Bernspång, OT, DrMedSc, is Research Occupational Therapist, Department of Occupational Therapy and Department of Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
  • Anne G. Fisher, ScD, OTR, is Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Applied Human Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado
  • Bengt Winblad, MD, PhD, is Head of the Section of Medicine, Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, and Head of the Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Family Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
Article Information
Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia / Neurologic Conditions / Research
Research Article   |   August 1994
Comparing Motor and Process Ability of Persons With Suspected Dementia in Home and Clinic Settings
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 1994, Vol. 48, 689-696. doi:10.5014/ajot.48.8.689
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 1994, Vol. 48, 689-696. doi:10.5014/ajot.48.8.689
Abstract

Objectives. Evaluating functional level of persons with diagnosed or suspected dementia is an important part of occupational therapy. The importance of the environment is often highlighted. We investigated the ability of clients with suspected dementia to perform instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) in the clinic versus in their homes.

Method. We used the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) to measure the motor and process skill ability of 19 clients with suspected dementia.

Results. Using two-tailed paired t-tests ,we found no overall difference in IADL motor or process performance between the clinic and home settings. However, of the 19 clients, 6 had motor ability measures, whereas 5 had process ability measures that differed significantly between the two settings.

Conclusion. The results suggest that if we want to know how a person with suspected dementia performs in IADLs in a specific environment we should test him or her in that environment.