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Research Article  |   August 1994
Using the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills to Compare Occupational Performance Between Clinic and Home Settings
Author Affiliations
  • Steve Park, MS, OTR L, is Assistant Professor, School of Occupational Therapy, Pacific University, 2043 College Way, Forest Grove, Oregon 97116. At the time of this study, he was a student in the postprofessional occupational therapy program, university of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
  • Anne G. Fisher, ScD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor, Occupational Therapy Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado
  • Craig A. Velozo, PhD, OTR L, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
Article Information
Assessment Development and Testing / Geriatrics/Productive Aging / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Research
Research Article   |   August 1994
Using the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills to Compare Occupational Performance Between Clinic and Home Settings
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 1994, Vol. 48, 697-709. doi:10.5014/ajot.48.8.697
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 1994, Vol. 48, 697-709. doi:10.5014/ajot.48.8.697
Abstract

Objectives. The study described in this article examined the effect of home versus clinic settings on the instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) performance of older adults.

Method. Twenty older adults living in the community were evaluated in their homes and in an occupational therapy clinic with the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS). The motor and process ability measures were compared between the two settings with many-faceted Rasch analysis.

Results. The subjects’ motor ability measures tended to remain stable from clinic to home settings. The process ability measures tended not to remain stable from Clinic to home settings, because 10 of the 20 subjects performed significantly better in their homes.

Conclusion. These findings support the idea that process skill abilities are affected by the environment to a greater degree than are motor skill abilities and that for persons living in the community, the familiar home environment tends to support IADL performance. If an occupational therapist wants to know how a person performs IADLs, the therapist should evaluate that person’s performance in the environment in which the client will be functioning.