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Research Article  |   February 1993
An Analysis of a Board Game as a Treatment Activity
Author Affiliations
  • Maureen E. Neistadt, ScD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Occupational Therapy Department, School of Health and Human Services, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824
  • Debra McAuley, OTR/L, is an Occupational Therapy Supervisor, Exeter Hospital, Exeter, New Hampshire
  • Donna Zecha, OTR/L, is a Staff Occupational Therapist, Exeter Hospital, Exeter, New Hampshire
  • Robyn Shannon, OTR/L, is a Staff Occupational Therapist, Exeter Hospital, Exeter, New Hampshire
Article Information
Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Practice
Research Article   |   February 1993
An Analysis of a Board Game as a Treatment Activity
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 1993, Vol. 47, 154-160. doi:10.5014/ajot.47.2.154
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 1993, Vol. 47, 154-160. doi:10.5014/ajot.47.2.154
Abstract

Occupational therapists often use tabletop board games in treatment to help adult clients with physical disabilities improve the perceptual, cognitive, sensory, and fine motor skill components of occupational behavior. Detailed activity analyses of these types of activities, including performance norms, are not available in the occupational therapy literature. Such analyses would help therapists consider the multiple skill demands of tabletop games and allow more systematic grading of these treatment activities. This paper presents a model for analyzing therapeutic activities in relation to relevant motor learning and cognitive–perceptual literature. Included in this analysis are a description of the activity, examination of its component skills and of the qualitative features of activity performance, suggestions for grading and for treatment goals, and some preliminary performance standards derived from a pilot study of 18 adults without physical disabilities. The issue of transfer of skills between games and functional activities is also discussed.