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Research Article  |   June 1993
Student Coping Strategies and Perceptions of Fieldwork
Author Affiliations
  • Marlys M. Mitchell, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor, Division of Occupational Therapy, Medical School Wing E, CB-7120, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599–7120
  • Charlene M. Kampfe, PhD, is Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona. At the time of this study, she was Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Article Information
Education of OTs and OTAs / Education
Research Article   |   June 1993
Student Coping Strategies and Perceptions of Fieldwork
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, June 1993, Vol. 47, 535-540. doi:10.5014/ajot.47.6.535
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, June 1993, Vol. 47, 535-540. doi:10.5014/ajot.47.6.535
Abstract

A questionnaire, the revised Ways of Coping Checklist, was sent to all professional (entry-level) graduate students in the United States in one academic year during their second fieldwork level II experience to determine what coping strategies they used during their fieldwork experience. Information was also gathered regarding their perceptions of this clinical experience. Responses from 101 students showed that they used Problem-Focused and Seeks Social Support strategies more than Wishful Thinking, Blamed Self, or Avoidance strategies. More than half of the students found the experience to be stressful, and almost all agreed that it was important. Most agreed that they had control over their present circumstances in the fieldwork experience.