Free
Research Article  |   June 1994
A Global Perspective on Feeding Assessment in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
Author Affiliations
  • Robin P. Glass, MS, OTR/L, is a Clinical Specialist for Infants, Children’s Hospital and Medical Center, Seattle, Washington; and Clinical Assistant Professor, Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. (Mailing address: P. O. Box C5371, 4800 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, Washington 98105)
  • Lynn S. Wolf, MOT, OTR/L, is a Clinical Specialist for Infants, Children’s Hospital and Medical Center, Seattle, Washington; and Research Associate, Department of Pediatrics at the University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
Article Information
Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Special Issue on the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
Research Article   |   June 1994
A Global Perspective on Feeding Assessment in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, June 1994, Vol. 48, 514-526. doi:10.5014/ajot.48.6.514
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, June 1994, Vol. 48, 514-526. doi:10.5014/ajot.48.6.514
Abstract

A comprehensive assessment of feeding performance of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) includes not only the traditional approaches of evaluating oral motor control and sensory responses but also evaluation of other factors. Infant feeding is a highly complex and integrated process involving numerous body systems. A global assessment would determine the infant’s feeding function in the key areas of state and behavior, tactile responses, motoric control, oral motor function, physiologic control, and coordination of Sucking, swallowing, and breathing. Information is obtained through skilled clinical observation as well as from technological monitors or medical tests and procedures. This article provides an overview of a comprehensive assessment that occupational therapists may use when providing service to infants in the NICU.