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Research Article  |   October 1994
The Effect of Music on Repetitive Disruptive Vocalizations of Persons With Dementia
Author Affiliations
  • Julie A. Casby, MOT, OTR L, is Staff Therapist, California Children’s Service, Health Department, 780 Thornton Way, San Jose, California 95128
  • Margo B. Holm, PhD, OTR L, FAOTA, is Professor of Occupational Therapy, School of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, Washington, and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Department of psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, pennsylvania
Article Information
Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia / Neurologic Conditions / Special Issue on Functional Outcomes
Research Article   |   October 1994
The Effect of Music on Repetitive Disruptive Vocalizations of Persons With Dementia
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 1994, Vol. 48, 883-889. doi:10.5014/ajot.48.10.883
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 1994, Vol. 48, 883-889. doi:10.5014/ajot.48.10.883
Abstract

Objective. This study examined the effect of classical music and favorite music on the repetitive disruptive vocalizations of long-term-care facility (LTCF) residents with dementia of the Alzheimer’s type (DAT).

Method. Three subjects diagnosed with DAT who had a history of repetitive disruptive vocalizations were selected for the study. Three single-subject withdrawal designs (ABA, ACA, and ABCA) were used to assess subjects’ repetitive disruptive vocalizations during each phase: no intervention (A); relaxing, classical music (B); and favorite music (C).

Results. Classical music and favorite music significantly decreased the number of vocalizations in two of the three subjects (p < .05).

Conclusion. These findings support a method that was effective in decreasing the disruptive vocalization pattern common in those with DAT in the least restrictive manner, as mandated by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987.