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Research Article  |   October 1994
Stability and Change in Functional Assessment of Patients With Geropsychiatric Disorders
Author Affiliations
  • Joan c. Rogers, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (Mailing address: 3811 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213)
  • Margo B. Holm, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor of Occupational Therapy, School of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, Washington, and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Gerald Goldstein, PhD, is Research Career Scientist, Highland Drive DVA Medical Center, and Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Michael McCue, PhD, is Director, Center for Applied Neuropsychology, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Paul D. Nussbaum, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Allegheny Neuropsychiatric Institute, Medical College of Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Article Information
Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia / Geriatrics/Productive Aging / Mental Health / Neurologic Conditions / Special Issue on Functional Outcomes
Research Article   |   October 1994
Stability and Change in Functional Assessment of Patients With Geropsychiatric Disorders
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 1994, Vol. 48, 914-918. doi:10.5014/ajot.48.10.914
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 1994, Vol. 48, 914-918. doi:10.5014/ajot.48.10.914
Abstract

Objectives. Functional assessments of patients with geropsychiatric disorders accomplished by self-rating, informant rating, and performance test were compared.

Method. Fifty-eight inpatients with major depression or progressive dementia were evaluated on three occasions over 6 months with informant and patient versions of the Activities of Daily Living Scale of the Older Americans Resources and Services Multidimensional Functional Assessment (OARS-ADL) and with the Performance Assessment of Self-Care Skills (PASS).

Results. Patients’ scores became significantly worse (p < .01) on the informant version of the OARS-ADL and the PASS. Self-ratings with the OARS-ADL did not worsen significantly (p > .05).

Conclusion. Agreement between informant rating and performance test concerning functional status of patients with dementia was good. Elderly patients with depression may experience subtle deterioration that only becomes apparent on performance tests.