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Research Article  |   November 1994
Relationship Between Visuomotor and Handwriting Skills of Children in Kindergarten
Author Affiliations
  • Marsha J. Weil, MS, OTR/L, is an Occupational Therapist, Bellevue School District, Bellevue, Washington. (Mailing address: 17006 Northeast 133rd Street, Redmond, Washington 98052)
  • Susan J. Cunningham Amundson, MS, OTR/L, is a Lecturer, Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
Article Information
Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / School-Based Practice / AOTA Archival Issue / Research
Research Article   |   November 1994
Relationship Between Visuomotor and Handwriting Skills of Children in Kindergarten
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November/December 1994, Vol. 48, 982-988. doi:10.5014/ajot.48.11.982
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November/December 1994, Vol. 48, 982-988. doi:10.5014/ajot.48.11.982
Abstract

Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the performance of children in kindergarten on the Developmental Test of Visual–Motor Integration (VMI) and their ability to copy letters legibly.

Method. Sixty typically developing children in kindergarten aged 64 months to 75 months (30 girls and 30 boys) were administered the VMI and the scale of Children’s Readiness In PrinTing (SCRIPT). The SCRIPT requires children to copy 26 lower case letters and 8 upper case letters from a model.

Results. A significant relationship was found between subjects’ performance on the VMI and ability to copy letters legibly. In addition, as subjects’ ability to copy the forms on the VMI increased, a concomitant increase in ability to copy letters was also found. There were no gender differences in performance on the VMI or on the SCRIPT.

Conclusion. The findings of this study suggest that most children in kindergarten similar to those in this study will be ready for handwriting instruction in the latter part of the kindergarten year.