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Research Article  |   September 1999
Development of a Functional Measure for Persons With Alzheimer’s Disease: The Disability Assessment for Dementia
Author Affiliations
  • Isabelle Gélinas, PhD, OT(C), is Assistant Professor, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, 3654 Drummond Street, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H3G 1Y5
  • Louise Gauthier, MSc, OT(C), was Associate Professor and Associate Director of Occupational Therapy, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, at the time of this study
  • Maria McIntyre, MSc, OT(C), is Occupational Therapist, Jewish Rehabilitation Hospital, Laval, Quebec, Canada
  • Serge Gauthier, MD, FRCP(C), is Professor, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Psychiatry, Medicine, McGill Centre for Studies in Aging, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Article Information
Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia / Assessment Development and Testing / Neurologic Conditions / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Assessment
Research Article   |   September 1999
Development of a Functional Measure for Persons With Alzheimer’s Disease: The Disability Assessment for Dementia
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 1999, Vol. 53, 471-481. doi:10.5014/ajot.53.5.471
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 1999, Vol. 53, 471-481. doi:10.5014/ajot.53.5.471
Abstract

Objectives. This article describes the development of an assessment of functional disability for use with proxyrespondents of community-dwelling persons who have Alzheimer’s disease as well as a study testing its reliability.

Method. Panels composed of health care professionals and caregivers of persons with Alzheimer’s disease were used to develop the Disability Assessment for Dementia (DAD). Fifty-nine caregivers participated in the refinement of the content and the testing of reliability.

Results. The DAD includes 40 items: 17 related to basic self-care and 23 to instrumental activities of daily living. It demonstrated a high degree of internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha = .96) and excellent interrater (N = 31, ICC = .95) and test–retest (N = 45, ICC = .96) reliability. In addition, it was found not to have gender bias.

Conclusion. This instrument may help clinicians and caregivers of the population with Alzheimer’s disease make decisions regarding the choice of suitable interventions.