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Research Article  |   September 1999
The Effects of Occupational Therapy With Sensory Integration Emphasis on Preschool-Age Children With Autism
Author Affiliations
  • Jane Case-Smith, EdD, BCP, OT/L, is Associate Professor, The Ohio State University, 406 SAMP, 1583 Perry Street, Columbus, Ohio 43210; Case-smith.1@osu.edu
  • Teresa Bryan, MS, OT/L, is Occupational Therapist, Grove City, Ohio
Article Information
Autism/Autism Spectrum Disorder / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Sensory Integration and Processing / Autism
Research Article   |   September 1999
The Effects of Occupational Therapy With Sensory Integration Emphasis on Preschool-Age Children With Autism
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 1999, Vol. 53, 489-497. doi:10.5014/ajot.53.5.489
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 1999, Vol. 53, 489-497. doi:10.5014/ajot.53.5.489
Abstract

Objective. Using single-subject research design, the effects of an occupational therapy intervention emphasizing sensory integration with five preschool children with autism were examined.

Method. In the AB design, nonengagement, mastery play, and interaction were measured, using videotape clips of each child’s free play in the preschool. Following a 3-week baseline, an occupational therapist provided one-on-one sessions and consultation to teachers for 10 weeks.

Results. When baseline and intervention phases were compared, four children demonstrated decreased frequency of nonengaged behavior, and three demonstrated increased frequency of mastery (goal-directed) play. Improvements in frequency of interaction were minimal.

Conclusion. The results support descriptions in the literature regarding the behavioral changes that children with autism can make when participating in intervention using a sensory integration approach.