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Research Article  |   April 1992
Perspectives on an Oral Motor Activity: The Use of Rubber Tubing as a “Chewy”
Author Affiliations
  • Carol R. Scheerer, MEd, OTR/L, is an Occupational Therapist for the Cincinnati Public Schools, Roll Hill Elementary School, 2411 Baltimore Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 45225
Article Information
Practice
Research Article   |   April 1992
Perspectives on an Oral Motor Activity: The Use of Rubber Tubing as a “Chewy”
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 1992, Vol. 46, 344-352. doi:10.5014/ajot.46.4.344
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 1992, Vol. 46, 344-352. doi:10.5014/ajot.46.4.344
Abstract

Among school-aged children with learning and behavioral problems, a therapeutic tool found to be helpful is a “chewy.” A chewy is a cylindrical piece of rubber tubing, the ends of which are placed in the mouth and are chewed or sucked on. This behavior appears to have a calming, organizing, and focusing effect on the child. In addition, for some children who put nonedible items in their mouths, a chewy can provide an appropriate sensory substitute or alternative.

A literature review supporting the benefits of oral motor input is discussed. Three case studies of children using a chewy are presented. A discussion follows regarding the therapeutic benefits of the use of a chewy and the consideration of it as part of a child’s sensory diet. Important guidelines regarding the appearance, taste, length, durability, and sanitation of the chewy are reviewed.