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Research Article  |   June 1992
Application of the Allen Cognitive Level Test in Assessing Cognitive Level Functioning of Emotionally Disturbed Boys
Author Affiliations
  • Marsha E. Shapiro, MS, OTR/L, is Clinical Instructor, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Related Professions, 515 Stockton Kimball Tower, State University of New York at Buffalo, 3435 Main Street, Buffalo, New York 14214. She is also a doctoral student in educational psychology in the Department of Counseling and Educational Psychology, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York
Article Information
Mental Health / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Education
Research Article   |   June 1992
Application of the Allen Cognitive Level Test in Assessing Cognitive Level Functioning of Emotionally Disturbed Boys
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, June 1992, Vol. 46, 514-520. doi:10.5014/ajot.46.6.514
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, June 1992, Vol. 46, 514-520. doi:10.5014/ajot.46.6.514
Abstract

The purpose of this study was to ascertain the applicability of the Allen Cognitive Level Test (ACL) (Allen, 1982, 1985), developed for use with adult psychiatric patients, to emotionally disturbed children aged 8 to 15 years. The subjects’ performance on the ACL was compared with their performance on two other instruments that measure features of cognition: the Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration (VMI) (Beery & Buktenica, 1982) and the Perceptual Memory Task (McCarron, 1984). Pearson product-moment correlations were computed to study the relationships of the ACL, the Perceptual Memory Task full-scale and sub-scale scores, and the VMI raw and age-equivalent scores. The Perceptual Memory Task scores showed little or no correlation with the ACL scores. Correlations of the ACL with the VMI scores revealed moderate but significant coefficients. A relationship between age and ACL score was found. Preliminary data would indicate that the ability of emotionally disturbed children to function in the school environment depends on their mastery of task demands and that occupational therapy intervention cannot be based solely on age or level of intelligence.