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Research Article  |   July 1993
Restaurant Wheelchair Accessibility
Author Affiliations
  • Linda McClain, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, is Associate Professor, Graduate Program Director, and Assistant Chairperson, Occupational Therapy Education, 3033 Robinson, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, Kansas 66160-7602
  • Debra Beringer, OTR, is a Staff Therapist, Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital, Lincoln, Nebraska
  • Heather Kuhnert, OTR, is a Staff Therapist, Nova Care, Inc., Lee’s Summit, Missouri
  • Johna Priest, OTR, is a Staff Therapist, Lee’s Summit Hospital, Lee’s Summit, Missouri
  • Emily Wilkes, OTR, is a Staff Therapist, Cox Hospital South, Springfield, Missouri
  • Sue Wilkinson, OTR, is a Staff Therapist, Kaiser Rehabilitation Center, Tulsa, Oklahoma
  • Lisa Wyrick, OTR, is a Staff Therapist, Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital, Lincoln, Nebraska. At the time of this study, all except the first author were senior occupational therapy students at the University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas
Article Information
Home Accessibility/Environmental Modification / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Practice
Research Article   |   July 1993
Restaurant Wheelchair Accessibility
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 1993, Vol. 47, 619-623. doi:10.5014/ajot.47.7.619
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 1993, Vol. 47, 619-623. doi:10.5014/ajot.47.7.619
Abstract

This study was designed to determine the compliance of restaurants to the wheelchair accessibility standards set forth in the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards. The standards that were operationalized in this study are also found in Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. The data were collected at 120 sites in three midwestern states. For one who uses a wheelchair, parking the car is often an obstacle to eating out. Only 53% of the restaurants surveyed provide handicapped parking. Entering the building may also be a problem. Of the restaurants that required a ramp, only 66% provided them. Inside the restaurant, the key problems were accessible restrooms and the height of tables. The study provided comparisons between restaurants in rural and urban settings, as well as comparisons between conventional restaurants and fast food restaurants. No notable differences emerged for these comparisons.