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Research Article  |   October 1993
The Influence of Ergonomic Factors and Perceptual–Motor Abilities on Handwriting Performance
Author Affiliations
  • Mei Hui Tseng, ScD, OTR, is a Lecturer, Occupational Therapy Division, School of Rehabilitation Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan. At the time of this study, she was a doctoral student in the Doctoral Program in Therapeutic Studies, Department of Occupational Therapy, Boston University, Sargent College, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Sharon A. Cermak, EdD, OTR, FAOTA, is Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy and Co-Director, Neurobehavioral Rehabilitation Research Center, Boston University, Sargent College, 635 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215
Article Information
Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / School-Based Practice / Research
Research Article   |   October 1993
The Influence of Ergonomic Factors and Perceptual–Motor Abilities on Handwriting Performance
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 1993, Vol. 47, 919-926. doi:10.5014/ajot.47.10.919
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 1993, Vol. 47, 919-926. doi:10.5014/ajot.47.10.919
Abstract

Difficulty with handwriting is one of the most frequent reasons that children in the public schools are referred to occupational therapy. Current research on the influence of ergonomic factors, such as pencil grip and pressure, and perceptual–motor factors traditionally believed to affect handwriting, is reviewed. Factors such as visual perception show little relationship to handwriting, whereas tactile–kinesthetic, visual–motor, and motor planning appear to be more closely related to handwriting. By better understanding the ergonomic and perceptual–motor factors that contribute to and influence handwriting, therapists will be better able to design rationally based intervention programs.