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Research Article  |   October 1993
Career Self-Efficacy in Occupational Therapy Practice
Author Affiliations
  • JoAnn V. Bush, MS, OTR, is Education Coordinator, Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan, Occupational Therapy Department, 261 Mack Boulevard, Detroit, Michigan 48201
  • Nancy J. Powell, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, is Associate Professor, Occupational Therapy Department, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan
  • Georgiana Herzberg, MA, OTR, is Lecturer, Occupational Therapy Department, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan
Article Information
Education of OTs and OTAs / Practice
Research Article   |   October 1993
Career Self-Efficacy in Occupational Therapy Practice
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 1993, Vol. 47, 927-933. doi:10.5014/ajot.47.10.927
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 1993, Vol. 47, 927-933. doi:10.5014/ajot.47.10.927
Abstract

Career expectations contribute to job satisfaction, which ultimately affects personnel retention. This paper focuses on a current trend in career literature: career self-efficacy, judgments about the efficacy of one’s career choice and adjustment. Career self-efficacy is relevant to occupational therapy in that therapists are leaving the profession because of unmet career expectations. This paper explores Bandura’s self-efficacy theory (the basis of career self-efficacy) and discusses the authors’ experience in clinical practice and education relating the application of career self-efficacy to occupational therapy. Suggested methods for enhancing career self-efficacy include the implementation of a professional development course based on Bandura’s self-efficacy theory; incorporation of self-efficacy content into the professional theory and practice courses; clinical supervision that creates realistic self-perceptions of performance during the fieldwork experience; and transitional programs for entry-level practitioners that identify and explore personal career expectations and support for the experienced practitioner.