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Research Article  |   July 1992
Comparison of Performance in Materials-Based Occupation, Imagery-Based Occupation, and Rote Exercise in Nursing Home Residents
Author Affiliations
  • Ellen M. Lang, MS, OTR, is Staff Therapist, Mercy Memorial Medical Center, 1234 Napier Avenue, St. Joseph, Michigan 49085
  • David L. Nelson, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, is Professor, Occupational Therapy Department, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan
  • Mary Ann Bush, MA, OTR, is Professor, Occupational Therapy Department, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan
Article Information
Complementary/Alternative Approaches / Geriatrics/Productive Aging / Long-Term Care/Skilled Nursing Facilities / Research
Research Article   |   July 1992
Comparison of Performance in Materials-Based Occupation, Imagery-Based Occupation, and Rote Exercise in Nursing Home Residents
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 1992, Vol. 46, 607-611. doi:10.5014/ajot.46.7.607
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 1992, Vol. 46, 607-611. doi:10.5014/ajot.46.7.607
Abstract

Materials-based occupation, imagery-based occupation, and rote exercise have been examined individually by several researchers. The present study compares all three approaches with one another (i.e., kicking a balloon, imagining kicking a balloon, and a control rote exercise) in nursing home residents. The dependent variable was the number of exercise repetitions. The subjects were 12 women and 3 men between 56 and 93 years of age residing in two nursing homes. All subjects experienced the three approaches but in different orders. One-way analysis of variance for related measures indicated a significant difference among conditions (p = .004). The Tukey procedure (Stevens, 1986) determined that the materials-based occupation condition elicited significantly more repetitions than the other two conditions. The difference between the imagery-based occupation and rote exercise was not statistically significant. These findings support our profession’s historical emphasis on the use of physical materials to enhance performance.