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Research Article  |   September 1992
Reliability and Construct Validity of the Clinical Observations of Motor and Postural Skills
Author Affiliations
  • Brenda Wilson, MS, OT(C), is Research Coordinator, Behavioural Research Unit, Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Centre, 1820 Richmond Road SW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2T 5C7
  • Nancy Pollock, MSc, OT(C), is Assistant Professor, School of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, McMaster University, and Research Manager, Occupational Therapy, Chedoke-McMaster Hospitals, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
  • Bonnie J. Kaplan, PhD, is Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, and Director, Behavioural Research Unit, Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • Mary Law, MSc, OT(C), is Assistant Professor, School of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy and Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, and is Research Associate, Occupational Therapy, Chedoke-McMaster Hospitals, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
  • Peter Faris, MSc, is Database Analyst, Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Research
Research Article   |   September 1992
Reliability and Construct Validity of the Clinical Observations of Motor and Postural Skills
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September 1992, Vol. 46, 775-783. doi:10.5014/ajot.46.9.775
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September 1992, Vol. 46, 775-783. doi:10.5014/ajot.46.9.775
Abstract

The Clinical Observations of Motor and Postural Skills (COMPS) is a screening tool for children with motor incoordination. A study of reliability (test-retest, interrater, and internal consistency) and construct validity with 132 children, both with and without developmental coordination disorder, is reported here. Test-retest reliability over 2 weeks was high: .92 for a group of 48 children. Interrater reliability for occupational therapists experienced in pediatrics was also excellent: .87 for a group of 72 children. Internal consistency of the COMPS was high, particularly when one of the seven items (Schilder’s arm extension) was deleted. The test discriminates well between children with and without motor problems and has many properties of a good screening test.