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Research Article  |   February 1991
Analysis of Upper Extremity Movement in Four Sitting Positions: A Comparison of Persons With and Without Cerebral Palsy
Author Affiliations
  • James J. McPherson, MS, OTR, is Associate Professor, Occupational Therapy Program, School of Allied Health Professions, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 5320l
  • Richard Schild, PhD, is Associate Professor, Department of Human Kinetics, School of Allied Health Professions, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  • Sandi J. Spaulding, MSc, OTR, is a doctoral student in biomechanics, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. At the time of this study, she was Assistant Professor, Occupational Therapy Program, School of Allied Health Professions, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  • Paula Barsamian, MS, OTR, is an Ad Hoc Instructor in the Physical Education Department, Carroll College, Waukesha, Wisconsin
  • Carol Transon, MS, OTR, is Director of Occupational Therapy, Shared Therapeutic Services, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  • Scott C. White, PhD, is Associate Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy and Exercise Science, School of Allied Health Professions, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Research
Research Article   |   February 1991
Analysis of Upper Extremity Movement in Four Sitting Positions: A Comparison of Persons With and Without Cerebral Palsy
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 1991, Vol. 45, 123-129. doi:10.5014/ajot.45.2.123
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 1991, Vol. 45, 123-129. doi:10.5014/ajot.45.2.123
Abstract

The purposes of this study were to compare the arm movements of persons with and without cerebral palsy and to determine if the alteration of the seat angle of a chair affected the quality of those movements. Twelve subjects—3 men and 3 women with spastic cerebral palsy and 3 men and 3 women without any known anomalies that could affect arm movements—were studied. The number of movement elements constituting a reach was used to measure the quality of movements. The findings demonstrated significant differences in the number of movement elements used by the subjects with and without cerebral palsy regardless of position. No significant differences could be attributed to the seating positions. Implications are discussed in relation to the method used in the analysis of movements and the effect of the findings for research and treatment.