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Research Article  |   April 1991
A Problem-Solving Version of the Allen Cognitive Level Test
Author Affiliations
  • Naomi Josman, MA, OTR, is a doctoral student in the Occupational Therapy Department, SEHNAP Education Building, 11th Floor, New York University, 35 West Fourth Street, New York, New York 10003. At the time of this study, she was an Instructor in the Occupational Therapy Department, Tel Aviv University, Israel
  • Noomi Katz, PhD, OTR, is Associate Professor, School of Occupational Therapy, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel
Article Information
Mental Health / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Work and Industry / Research
Research Article   |   April 1991
A Problem-Solving Version of the Allen Cognitive Level Test
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 1991, Vol. 45, 331-338. doi:10.5014/ajot.45.4.331
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 1991, Vol. 45, 331-338. doi:10.5014/ajot.45.4.331
Abstract

The purpose of this study was to construct and validate a problem-solving version of the existing Allen Cognitive Level Test (ACL) (Allen, 1985). The new problem-solving version of the ACL (ACL–PS) follows the theoretical developments of the cognitive disability theory and the information processing approach. It was constructed to provide a more accurate assessment of the problem-solving process as well as task performance, especially at the higher cognitive levels. Both tests were administered to a psychiatric adolescent group (n = 49) who were subdivided according to diagnosis and to a matched nondysfunctional control group (n = 29).

The results showed that both the ACL and the ACL–PS differentiated significantly between the patients and the control subjects and among the patient groups. At Level 6 of the ACL, none of the subjects needed any demonstration, with all scores distributed between independent performance or performance following verbal instructions only, that is, problem-solving phases that were added with the ACL–PS. The scoring of the ACL–PS is provided in addition to detailed scoring of the cognitive levels. It is suggested that the ACL–PS be implemented as a clinical evaluative tool with adolescents.