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Research Article  |   November 1993
Single-Switch Computer Access for Infants and Toddlers
Author Affiliations
  • Yvonne Swinth, MS, OTR/L, is currently enrolled in the joint doctoral program between the College of Education and the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, and is a staff therapist at the University Place School District in Tacoma, Washington. (Mailing address: 4703 73rd Ave Ct W, Tacoma, Washington 98466)
  • Denis Anson, MS, OTR/L, is an Acting Instructor, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
  • Jean Deitz, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is an Associate Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
Article Information
Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Special Issue on Assistive Technology
Research Article   |   November 1993
Single-Switch Computer Access for Infants and Toddlers
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November 1993, Vol. 47, 1031-1038. doi:10.5014/ajot.47.11.1031
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November 1993, Vol. 47, 1031-1038. doi:10.5014/ajot.47.11.1031
Abstract

Computer access was studied with children between the ages of 6 months and 18 months with no known handicapping conditions. The research focused on determining at what age young children can access a computer using a single-switch system to run a simple cause-and-effect program. The sample consisted of 80 children divided into four groups (6 to 8 months, 9 to 11 months, 12 to 14 months, and 15 to 17 months). Results demonstrated that some children as young as 6 months of age could control a computer-based, cause-and-effect program using a single-switch access system. Therefore, professionals who work with children with disabilities may consider introducing computers to children at this age or to children who are functioning near this cognitive developmental level.