Free
Research Article  |   January 1992
The History of Work in Physical Dysfunction
Author Affiliations
  • Carolyn Schmidt Hanson, MA, OTR/L, is Lecturer, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Florida, Box J–164 JHMHC, Gainesville, Florida 32610–0164
  • Kay F. Walker, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Article Information
Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Work and Industry / Research
Research Article   |   January 1992
The History of Work in Physical Dysfunction
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January 1992, Vol. 46, 56-62. doi:10.5014/ajot.46.1.56
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January 1992, Vol. 46, 56-62. doi:10.5014/ajot.46.1.56
Abstract

Work has been at the core of occupational therapy for the last seven and a half decades. The tenets of work, which include providing a way of making a living and giving meaning to one’s existence, have remained consistent throughout occupational therapists’ use of work in the treatment of physical disabilities during three eras: World Wars I and II, the era of industrial therapy, and the work-hardening era. Although technological advances and economics have changed the scope of work, it is evident that the work-hardening programs of today have their roots in the work cure of the early 1900s.