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Research Article  |   September 1991
The Effects of Habilitative Hospital Admission on Self-Care, Self-Esteem, and Frequency of Physical Care
Author Affiliations
  • Deborah J. Bolding, MS, OTR, is Occupational Therapist II, Children’s Hospital at Stanford, Palo Alto, California 94304. At the time of this study, she was an Occupational Therapist at Shriner’s Hospital for Crippled Children, San Francisco, California
  • Lela A. Llorens, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, is Professor, Chair, and Graduate Coordinator, Department of Occupational Therapy, San Jose University, San Jose, California
Article Information
Research
Research Article   |   September 1991
The Effects of Habilitative Hospital Admission on Self-Care, Self-Esteem, and Frequency of Physical Care
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 1991, Vol. 45, 796-800. doi:10.5014/ajot.45.9.796
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 1991, Vol. 45, 796-800. doi:10.5014/ajot.45.9.796
Abstract

The effects of a habilitative hospital admission for the multidisciplinary teaching of activities of daily living were investigated with 3 children with spina bifida and 1 child with juvenile arthritis. Specific evaluation tools included analysis of individualized goals, the Klein-Bell Activity of Daily Living Scale (Klein & Bell, 1979), the Physical Child Care Record (Johnson & Dietz, 1985), and the Piers–Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale (Piers & Harris, 1967). The children were evaluated on hospital admission, at discharge, and 3 months after discharge. The results show that hospital admission can be an effective means of increasing independence and decreasing frequency of physical care by parents. Some changes in self-esteem occurred in both directions; however, these changes may be attributed to variables other than hospitalization or changes in self-care status.