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Research Article  |   January 1989
Changes in Occupational Role Performance After a Severe Burn: A Retrospective Study
Author Affiliations
  • Susan Cheng, MS, OTR/L, is an occupational therapist in the Hand Rehabilitation Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27704
  • Joan C. Rogers, PhD, OTR/L, is Professor of Occupational Therapy at the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Article Information
Wound Management / Features
Research Article   |   January 1989
Changes in Occupational Role Performance After a Severe Burn: A Retrospective Study
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January 1989, Vol. 43, 17-24. doi:10.5014/ajot.43.1.17
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January 1989, Vol. 43, 17-24. doi:10.5014/ajot.43.1.17
Abstract

Ten men with severe burn injuries were interviewed to examine their perceptions of the residual impact of severe burn on performance in self-care, home management, work, and leisure occupations within the year after rehabilitation. Three patterns of occupational role performance after a burn were identified: (a) a resumption of participation in all four occupational categories; (b) a return to independence in self-care with substantive impairment in home management, work, and/or leisure roles; and (c) substantive disruption in all occupational roles. Role loss or disruption was commonly associated with reduced endurance, intolerance for standing and walking, and impaired grip strength and upper extremity skill. Suggestions for rehabilitation programming and research are made.