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Research Article  |   March 1989
Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment (LOTCA) Battery for Brain-Injured Patients: Reliability and Validity
Author Affiliations
  • Noomi Katz, PhD, OTR, is Assistant Professor, School of Occupational Therapy, Hebrew University, Mount Scopus, PO Box 24026, Jerusalem 91240, Israel
  • Malka Itzkovich, OTR, is Research Coordinator, Occupational Therapy Department, Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital, Raanana, Israel
  • Sara Averbuch, OTR, is Senior Occupational Therapist, Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital, and faculty member, Occupational Therapy Department, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Israel
  • Betty Elazar, OTR, is Director, Occupational Therapy Department, Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital, Raanana, Israel
Article Information
Assessment Development and Testing / Neurologic Conditions / Stroke / Traumatic Brain Injury / Features
Research Article   |   March 1989
Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment (LOTCA) Battery for Brain-Injured Patients: Reliability and Validity
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March 1989, Vol. 43, 184-192. doi:10.5014/ajot.43.3.184
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March 1989, Vol. 43, 184-192. doi:10.5014/ajot.43.3.184
Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of the Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment (LOTCA) battery. The battery provides an initial profile of the cognitive abilities of the brain-injured patient that can be used as a starting point for occupational therapy intervention and as a screening test for further assessment. The LOTCA consists of 20 subtests and is divided into four areas: orientation, visual and spatial perception, visuomotor organization, and thinking operations. The battery takes 30 to 45 minutes to administer. Subjects in the study consisted of two patient groups (20 traumatic head injury patients and 28 cerebrovascular accident patients) and one control group (55 non-brain-injured adults). Results showed interrater reliability coefficients of .82 to .97 for the various subtests and an alpha coefficient of .85 and above for the internal consistency of the areas of perception, visuomotor organization, and thinking operations. The Wilcoxon two-sample test showed that all subtests differentiated at the .0001 level of significance between the patient groups and the control group. This supported the LOTCA’s validity. Furthermore, factor analysis provided initial construct validation for three areas of the battery: perception, visuomotor organization, and thinking operations.